Factors Influencing Retention of Female MBAs in Post Ivy-League Careers

Courtney Jane, Douglas P. Roberts, Bhaskar Sinha

Abstract


This qualitative research analyzes the experiences of the cohort of female MBA alumni from The Tuck School at Dartmouth College, class of 1992, relative to leaving their post-MBA careers within ten years post-graduation. The purpose of the research is to identify what led these women to exit their post-MBA intended careers, and what their perceptions are surrounding preparation and practices which could help to retain them, as well as other top-10 female MBAs, in corporate America. This work is important to corporate America, as women are not represented proportionally in leadership positions, which has a detrimental impact of corporate profitability. The results from the study suggest that corporate America, through their human resources departments, needs to undertake intentional and comprehensive cultural change that incorporate policies to support the unique needs of women and families. Furthermore, an agenda for national change is in order, where legislative mandates force corporate cultures to evolve so that women have the right work, not in a “man’s world,” but the right to work in a world that embraces the needs of men and women, mothers and fathers, and parents. Many suggestions for future research are listed, including: further studies of MBA alumni from top-10 business, medical, and law schools; a study of the current curriculum and programs at top-20 MBA programs; a study of actions and strategies that human resources in top corporations across America are doing to dampen the separation of females from their careers; and a study of Current Legislation Supporting National Change.


Keywords


Blue-chip companies, business schools, consumer products, human resources, ivy-league, M.B.A., strategic planning.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.24203/ajeel.v6i5.5503

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