Somaliland: Curbing Corruption and the Quest for Effective Governance

Authors

  • Nasir M. Ali Institute for Social Studies, based in Hargeisa, Somaliland or Researcher currently enrolling Center for African Studies Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia

Keywords:

corruption, nepotism, transparency, regime, governance, crisis, Somaliland

Abstract

This study examines the current corruption practices in Somaliland and how a once the promising democracy and economy of Somaliland has been betrayed by an elected regime and its future compromised by purging the most publicly-trusted figures from his cabinet members who were believed to be the chief architects of the regime’s economic recovery initiatives post–2010 election. The study finds out the ferocious policies which is not based meritocracy rather on ‘who you loyal to’ by appointing anyone who cannot pose any challenge against a legitimate minister with illegitimate executive power, the ‘Umaru Dikko’ of Somaliland who keep the will of the nation on a narrow edge. The study questions why Silanyo has spent eight years as an opposition figure against a regime less corruption and nepotism than his system, while recycling the most criticized policies of his predecessor. The conclusion outlines the need for having state persons to preserve the scarce resources of this poor tiny unrecognized nation in the Horn African region. And it raises the concerns from the state leaders and questions why the knowledge gaps that existed within some government officials include: lack of professional integrity and experience have not been purged from the government positions and replace them better state persons those at least could understand the needs of their fellow citizens.

 

Author Biography

Nasir M. Ali, Institute for Social Studies, based in Hargeisa, Somaliland or Researcher currently enrolling Center for African Studies Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia

Mr. Ali has obtained a Master’s Degree in International Relations from Ethiopia’s Addis Ababa University in 2010, and currently enrolling another program in African Studies with MA in the same university. Worked with the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) as a Graduate Attaché (2009–2010), and also served as a lecturer in Political Science, in the Department of Global Studies & International Relations at New Generation University College (2011–2012) in Addis Ababa Campus. A founding member of the Institute for Social Studies based in Hargeisa, Somaliland. He engages in the areas of teaching, research and policy analysis plus other intellectual activities. His areas of interest include: peace and conflict, security, climate change, environment, pastoralism, democracy, governance, and the state–society relations. Nasir has over dozen published and unpublished academic research articles and papers to his credit.

References

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Published

2014-02-15

How to Cite

Ali, N. M. (2014). Somaliland: Curbing Corruption and the Quest for Effective Governance. Asian Journal of Humanities and Social Studies, 2(1). Retrieved from https://ajouronline.com/index.php/AJHSS/article/view/851