Representation of Women as Femmes Fatales: History, Development and Analysis

Authors

  • Ayman Hassan Elhallaq English Language and Literature Department Islamic University of Gaza Palestine

Keywords:

Femme fatale, women representation, fatal women, feminism

Abstract

Abstract

The intention of this paper is to trace some of the history and the development of representation of women as femmes fatales in the western religious, mythological and literary narratives. It will explore the stereotype of the femme female character that has been established over ages. This study assumes that seduction and destruction qualities attached to the character of the femme fatale are not ends in themselves, but may be attributed to some social or economic or psychological reasons. To illustrate further, the paper provides examples from religion, mythology and literature to explain the representation of the femme fatale. To shed more light on the possible motives and purposes of a femme fatale character, the major female protagonist of George Eliot’s novel Adam Bede shall be analyzed.

Author Biography

Ayman Hassan Elhallaq, English Language and Literature Department Islamic University of Gaza Palestine

Assistant Prof.

English Department

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Published

2015-02-21

How to Cite

Elhallaq, A. H. (2015). Representation of Women as Femmes Fatales: History, Development and Analysis. Asian Journal of Humanities and Social Studies, 3(1). Retrieved from https://ajouronline.com/index.php/AJHSS/article/view/2295